Volume 2, Issue 2, December 2018, Page: 40-43
Comparative Study of Three Cowpea Variety Against Different Soil Samples
Aminu Abubakar, Department of Trypanosomiasis, Kano Liaison Office, Infectious Diseases Hospital, Kano, Nigeria
Haladu Ahmad Ibrahim, Department of Biology, School of Science Education, Sa'adatu Rimi College of Education, Kumbotso, Nigeria
Maryam Musa Karaye, Department of Biology, School of Science Education, Sa'adatu Rimi College of Education, Kumbotso, Nigeria
Maryam Ahmad Yaro, Department of Biology, School of Science Education, Sa'adatu Rimi College of Education, Kumbotso, Nigeria
Rahama Tijjani Babuga, Department of Biology, School of Science Education, Sa'adatu Rimi College of Education, Kumbotso, Nigeria
Badaria Abdussalam, Department of Biology, School of Science Education, Sa'adatu Rimi College of Education, Kumbotso, Nigeria
Received: May 21, 2018;       Accepted: Jun. 22, 2018;       Published: Nov. 5, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.jcebe.20180202.11      View  490      Downloads  56
Abstract
The effect of soil type and rate of germination on cowpea varieties (Vigna unguiculata) were studied. Three cowpea varieties viz, A (IT90K – 277 – 2), B (IT93K – 452 – 35) C (IT97L – 499 – 1) are planted under different soil types (sand, clay and loamy) and length of each plant with its corresponding number of leaves are recorded. The result of the experiment revealed that cowpea plant variety A (IT90K – 277 – 2) will be best suited for planting in sandy soil and the least recommendation for planting this variety is clay soil. For cowpea variety B (IT93K – 452 – 35) the best suited soil for planting is loamy soil and the least been planting it under sandy soil for variety C (IT97K – 499 – 1) the best soil growing this kind of variety is in clay soil and the least recommendation is planting on sandy soil.
Keywords
Cowpea, Vigna Unguiculata, Sandy, Loamy, Clay
To cite this article
Aminu Abubakar, Haladu Ahmad Ibrahim, Maryam Musa Karaye, Maryam Ahmad Yaro, Rahama Tijjani Babuga, Badaria Abdussalam, Comparative Study of Three Cowpea Variety Against Different Soil Samples, Journal of Chemical, Environmental and Biological Engineering. Vol. 2, No. 2, 2018, pp. 40-43. doi: 10.11648/j.jcebe.20180202.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Reference
[1]
Nkaa F. A., Nwokeocha, O. W., Ihuoma, O. (2014). Effect of Phosphorus fertilizer on growth and yield of cowpea (V. unguiculata). IOSR Journal of Pharmacy and Biological Sciences, 9 (5): 2278-3000.
[2]
Singh, B., Ajeigbe, H. A., Tarawali, S. A., Ferdinez-Rivera, S., Abubakar, M., (2003). Improving the production and utilization of cowpea as food and fodder. Field Crops Research, 84: 169-170.
[3]
Madamba, R., Grubben, G. J. H., Asante, I. K., Akromah, R., (2006). Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp record from protabase. Brink, M. and Belay, G. (Eds). PROTA (Plant Resources of Tropical Africa), Wageningen, Netherlands.
[4]
Sivasankar, S. et al. (ed.), Achieving sustainable cultivation of grain legumes Volume 2: Improving cultivation of particular grain legumes, Burleigh Dodds Science Publishing, Cambridge, UK, 2018, (ISBN: 978 1 78676 140 8; www.bdspublishing.com).
[5]
Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). 2012. Grassland species index. Vigna unguiculata http://www.fao.org/ag/AGP/AGPC/doc/Gbase/data/pf000090.htm
[6]
Thomas Jefferson Agricultural Institute (TJAI), 2010. Cowpea: a versatile legume for hot, dry conditions. Columbia, MO. http://www.jeffersoninstitute.org/pubs/cowpea.shtml
[7]
Dugje, I. Y., Omoigai, L. O., Ekeleme, F., Karama, A. Y., and Ajeigbe, H., (2009). Farmer;s guide to cowpea production in west Africa. IITA, Ibadan, Nigeria. pp. 20.
[8]
Sakariyawo O. S., Soremi P. A. S., Okeleye K. A. and Aderibigbe S. G. (2016). Variation in the performance of contrasting maturity class of cowpea cultivars (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp) in the derived savanna. Journal of Tropical Agriculture, Food, Environment and Extension, 15(2): 41-47.
[9]
Sheahan, C. M., (2012). Plant guide for cowpea (Vigna unguiculata). USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service, Cape May Plant Materials Center, Cape May, NJ.
[10]
Ohler, T. A., Nielsen, S. S. and Mitchell, C. A. (1996) Varying plant density and harvest time to optimize cowpea leaf yield and nutrient content. Hort Science 31: 193–197.
[11]
Gbaguidi A. A., Adjatin A. Dansi A. and Agbangla C. (2015). Diversity of Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (l) Walp.) Landraces in Central and Northern Benin. International Journal of Microbiology and Applied Sciences, 4(11): 487-504.
[12]
Stoilova, T., Pereira, G. (2013). Assessment of the genetic diversity in a germplasm collection of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) using morphological traits. African Journal of Agricultural Research, 8(2): 208-215.
[13]
Pasquet R. S. (1999). Genetic relationship among sub species of vigna unguiculata (L) Walp. Based on allozyme variation” Theoretical and Applied Genetics 98 (6–7): 1104–1119.
[14]
Singh, B. B., Chambliss, O. L. and Sharma, B. (1997) recent advances in cowpea breeding. In: Singh, B. B., Mohan Raj, D. R., Dashiell, K. E. and Jackai, L. E. N. (eds.) Advances in Cowpea Research. IITA and JIRCAS. International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Ibadan, Nigeria, pp. 30–49.
[15]
Gomez C. (2004). Cowpea: Post-harvest operations. In: Mejia (Ed.) postharvest compendium, AGST, FAO.
[16]
Tarawali S. A., Singh B. B., Peters M., Blade S. F. (1997). Cowpea haulms as fodder. In: Singh B. B, Advances in cowpea research, IITA.
[17]
Eziashi E. E; Ogundipe O. T 2005–2006 (Vigna unguiculata) Avata L. Walp.
Browse journals by subject